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David Goldman- “Good Money After Bad?: U.S. Aid to Egypt and the Muslim Brotherhood Part 1

This briefing was by David Goldman, a columnist who joined PJ Media in August 2011 after nearly 10 years of essaying as the Pseudonymous “Spengler” at Asia Times Online and two years of editing and writing at First Things.  He’s also the author of How Civilizations Die: (And Why Islam Is Dying Too).  Mr. Goldman’s career has been split between the financial and cultural worlds, and he has written extensively on cultural and religious matters.

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David Goldman- “Good Money After Bad?: U.S. Aid to Egypt and the Muslim Brotherhood” Part 2

This briefing was by David Goldman, a columnist who joined PJ Media in August 2011 after nearly 10 years of essaying as the Pseudonymous “Spengler” at Asia Times Online and two years of editing and writing at First Things.  He’s also the author of How Civilizations Die: (And Why Islam Is Dying Too).  Mr. Goldman’s career has been split between the financial and cultural worlds, and he has written extensively on cultural and religious matters.

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“The obscenities that I have referred to from a recently released as part of an organized campaign against Islamic sanctities are unacceptable and require a promise of firm stance. We have a responsibility in this international gathering to study how we can protect the world from instability and hatred. Egypt respects freedom of expression – freedom of expression that is not used to incite hatred against anyone – not a freedom of expression that target a specific religion or a specific culture. A freedom of expression that tackle extremism and violence – not a freedom of expression that deepens ignorance and disregards others.”  UN Speech by Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, 09/27/12

The Egyptian President, Mohammed Morsi, has given the United States – and the UN – its marching orders regarding the Islamic Prophet, Mohammed.  Insults against Mohammed, and against the Islamic faith, will not be tolerated.

Certainly, the Obama Administration will not object.  They have already enthusiasticallyparticipated in the “Istanbul Process”, which seeks to implement UN Resolution 16/18, the latest iteration of proposed international laws that seek to restrict speech that “denigrates” Islam.  Further, President Obama himself has decreed, in his own UN speech, that “the future must not belong to those who slander the prophet of Islam.”  Apparently, President Obama has never thought too highly of free speech, so, there may not be any daylight between the U.S. and Egyptian governments when it comes to such troublesome speech.

Of course, President Morsi had other demands as well.

Mr. Morsi said, in another New York appearance, that he wants Omar Abdul Rahman, the Egyptian Muslim cleric in a U.S. jail for the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, to serve out the rest of his life sentence at home in Egypt.  Rahman, who is referred to as the “Blind Sheikh,” issued fatwas and helped plan acts of Islamist terrorism.  In 1993, his followers detonated a truck bomb in a parking garage below the North Tower, with the intention of knocking it into the South Tower, thereby bringing both towers down and killing thousands of Americans.  The bomb failed to deliver these results, but it did kill six people and injured more than a thousand.  Presumably, the Egyptian President’s call for the Blind Sheikh to be transferred to an Egyptian jail supersedes his earlier demand for Rahman to simply be released.  But transfer or release, it seems that the U.S. State Department is seriously considering it.

Also, as expressed in a New York Times interview, President Morsi said it was up to Washington to revitalize its alliance with Egypt.  He clearly doesn’t believe that Egypt owes the U.S. anything, regardless of the fact that, between 1948 and 2011, the United States has already provided Egypt with $71.6 billion in foreign aid, including $1.3 billion a year in military aid from 1987 to the present.  Presumably, the $1.3 billion plus is now just a base requirement, which should be bolstered, either directly by the U.S. or indirectly through international organizations.  And sure enough, the Obama Administration has proposed a plan to provide $450 million in emergency domestic assistance, although Congress is currently blocking this.  The Administration also supports a $4.8 billion loan from the International Monetary Fund to Egypt; the U.S. provides about $64 billion a year to the IMF, by the way.

In that same interview Morsi also criticized the U.S. for not living up to its own Camp David commitment to Palestinian self-rule.   He said that Americans “have a special responsibility” for the Palestinians because the United States had signed the 1978 Camp David accord, and that “(a)s long as peace and justice are not fulfilled for the Palestinians, then the treaty remains unfulfilled.”  The fact that U.S. support for the governing anti-Semiticanti-Americancorruptterror supportinganti-democratic forces in “Palestine” is not actually in our best interest, can safely be ignored.  During the past term the Obama Administration has consistently and one-sidedly pushedIsrael to give up more and more concessions to the Palestinians for the sake of peace.  No doubt, after the election, President Obama will have even more “flexibility” to meet Morsi’s demands.

President Morsi also called for Egypt to be immune from any unnecessary moral evaluations by the U.S.  “If you want to judge the performance of the Egyptian people by the standards of German or Chinese or American culture, then there is no room for judgment,” he said.  So, for example, President Morsi probably believes that a fully democratic state with American style civil rights forcitizens and especially religious minorities is not appropriate for Egypt.  The same applies – or, perhaps more accurately, doesn’t apply – for granting equal rights to Egyptian women.  Democratic competition and the alternation of power between different political parties – if one of those parties is not Muslim Brotherhood affiliated – may also be a big no-no.  And, as mentioned before, free speech rights for the Egyptians are not ok, no matter how much the U.S. values them.  For that matter, based on Morsi’s UN speech, free speech isn’t okay for the U.S., in the U.S., when it concerns the religion of Islam.  Fortunately for Mr. Morsi, the Obama Administration has made clear it has a strong disinclination to judge other nations and cultures.

For example, President Morsi dismissed tepid criticism from the White House that he did not move fast enough to protect the U.S. Embassy in Cairo from Islamist rioters on September 11, 2012.  These rioters eventually climbed over the Embassy wall, burned the American flag, and replaced it with the black flag of radical Islam.  Egyptian guards did little to stop them, and President Morsi “remained conspicuously silent as protesters breached the walls of the American Embassy in Cairo — a stark contrast to the help, contrition and condemnation coming from the new government of Libya.” Contrary to the Obama Administration’s continued claims, these Islamist protesters were not objecting some bad California movie, but were actually protesting the continued detention of the Blind Sheikh.

These were Mr. Morsi’s demands.  And what will the U.S. get if we give President Morsi what he wants?

Once again, President Morsi told us exactly that in the Times interview.  In return for our compliance to the above requirements, Mr. Morsi suggested that Egypt would not be hostile to the West, although he also cautioned that it would not be as compliant to the U.S. as it was under Mr. Mubarak, either.  When specifically asked if Egypt would remain an ally of the U.S., President Morsi carefully responded, “(t)hat depends on your definition of ally.”

Once again, based on a statement by President Obama describing the U.S.’s current relationship with Egypt, this type of relationship may well be satisfactory to the Obama Administration.

Originally Published at The Blaze at https://www.theblaze.com/contributions/is-egypt-giving-the-united-states-its-marching-orders/

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On August 9, 2001, a bomb blast pulverized a Sbarro Pizzeria located at the corner of King George Street and Jaffa Road in Jerusalem, one of the busiest pedestrian crossings in Israel.  The blast occurred at 2 pm, on a summer holiday afternoon, when the restaurant was filled with customers and the street crowded with pedestrian traffic.

The terrorist and his bomb had been transported by taxi to the area by a woman named Ahlam Tamimi and another Palestinian, and it was concealed inside a guitar case. The pizzeria had been carefully selected by Tamimi to maximize civilian casualties. When the Palestinian suicide bomber exploded the bomb, 15 people were killed and at least 130 more were injured. Among those killed in the blast were two American citizens: Judith L. Greenbaum, 31, of New Jersey, and Malka Roth, 15, of New York.  Several other Americans were injured.

On October 18, 2011, as part of the deal made by Israel with Hamas, 1,027 Palestinian prisoners, including Tamimi, were exchanged for Gilad Shalit, an Israeli soldier. After being given money from both Hamas and the Palestinian Authority for her crime, she eventually moved to Jordan, where she has since become a celebrity in the Arab world, hosting her own weekly show on the Hamas satellite TV station, Al Quds. She also found time to get married – with live television coverage of her nuptials – to her equally loathsome terrorist fiancée, another Palestinian murderer who had also been released in the Shalit deal.

Tamimi could be prosecuted by the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) for her criminal murders of two Americans and the wounding of the other U.S. citizens. I have already written not one, but two columns about her case and possible prosecution. So far, however, despite attempts by various organizations, including my own, to pressure the DOJ to start these prosecutions, no U.S. criminal prosecution has occurred. The DOJ is blatantly ignoring its obligations under the Anti-Terrorism Act, 18 USC Sec. 2332, which calls for the prosecution and punishment, in United States courts, of individuals who murder or maim American citizens in acts of international terrorism. There is also no evidence that the Office of Justice for Victims of Overseas Terrorism (OJVOT) – the office that was created in 2005 specifically to monitor acts of terrorism against Americans outside the U.S. and pressure the rest of the DOJ to bring to justice those terrorists who have harmed Americans – has made any real effort to push the DOJ to begin a prosecution of Tamimi.

Nevertheless, I never expected to write a third column on this depraved individual, but then I saw this video interview with Tamimi celebrating the attacks and this heart-wrenching article by the parents of Malka Roth. Both demonstrate just how much Ahlam Tamimi is enjoying her fame and good fortune since her release. Further, these also show how little this particular Palestinian terrorist, the Palestinian “governments,” i.e., the Palestinian Authority and Hamas, and even our supposed ally, the nation of Jordan, respect the United States and the lives of our citizens. A woman responsible for the deaths of two Americans – one only 15 years old and another one pregnant with a child – is smiling and celebrating her crimes all over the Arab world, and she and the Arab governments that celebrate and reward her have absolutely no fear or concern that the United States will take any action to punish her or them. The twisted moral code shown here, and the lack of respect for the U.S., is almost unbelievable.

Should the DOJ ever bestir itself to go after Tamimi, I would like to point out that Tamimi’s post- imprisonment media appearances have made an already airtight case against her even tighter. As she had previously done in an earlier video, Tamimi has once again admitted to her crime on tape, and it may be used by the court to convict her. This is because Tamimi, as the defendant in a U.S. criminal prosecution, would meet the definition of a “party opponent,” and thus, under the federal rules of evidence, anything she says would be admissible in court. See FRE 801(d)(2)(A):

Rule 801. Definitions That Apply to This Article; Exclusions from Hearsay…

(d) Statements That Are Not Hearsay. A statement that meets the following conditions is not hearsay: … (2) An Opposing Party’s Statement. The statement is offered against an opposing party and: (A) was made by the party in an individual or representative capacity.

Even more importantly, there are now at least two taped confessions and, in contrast to the previous confession, which was filmed while she was still in an Israeli jail, in this most recent interview Tamimi cannot make the (already flimsy) argument that she was somehow forced – by coercion or physical beatings – to admit to her terrorist actions. In Jordan, she is under no duress from anyone; in fact, she is celebrating them.

Ahlam Tamimi has become more than just one Palestinian terrorist with blood on her hands. She is now a symbol of how weak the United States is, how unserious we are about continuing the conflicts formerly labeled the “War on Terror.” The longer her crimes go unpunished, the more dangerous she becomes as that symbol.

If she escapes justice completely, it will inevitably lead to more dead Americans.

Originally Published at Breitbart: Big Peace at https://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2012/09/11/Ahlam-Tamimi-Not-Sought-by-US-Govt

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Frank Gaffney- 11 Years After 9/11: What Went Wrong With American Policy?

The program included an esteemed panel of National Security and Counter-Terrorism experts, as well as Congressman Louis Gohmert of Texas, who introduced the event. Opening comments were also made by Sarah Stern, President & Founder of EMET, and Frank Gaffney, Center for Security Policy President & CEO and former Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy.

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Michael Wadlanski- 11 Years After 9/11: What Went Wrong With American Policy?

The program included an esteemed panel of National Security and Counter-Terrorism experts, as well as Congressman Louis Gohmert of Texas, who introduced the event. Opening comments were also made by Sarah Stern, President & Founder of EMET, and Frank Gaffney, Center for Security Policy President & CEO and former Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy.

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